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Lama Zopa Rinpoche gave this teaching to about fifty ordained Sangha during a visit to a giant shopping mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in April 2016.

Lama Zopa Rinpoche gave this teaching to about fifty ordained Sangha during a visit to a giant shopping mall in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, in April 2016.

Lama Zopa Rinpoche gave this teaching at a refuge ceremony held at Kopan Monastery, Nepal, on April 1, 1995.

Lama Zopa Rinpoche gave this teaching at a refuge ceremony held at Kopan Monastery, Nepal, on April 1, 1995.

An introductory teaching on karma given by Lama Yeshe at Chenrezig Institute, Queensland, Australia, on 28 June 1976.

An introductory teaching on karma given by Lama Yeshe at Chenrezig Institute, Queensland, Australia, on 28 June 1976.

Lama Yeshe discusses the real meaning of Dharma and the nature of the mind in this discourse given at Chenrezig Institute, Eudlo, Australia, on September 8, 1979.

Lama Yeshe discusses the real meaning of Dharma and the nature of the mind in this discourse given at Chenrezig Institute, Eudlo, Australia, on September 8, 1979.

A teaching given prior to a ceremony for generating the mind of enlightenment (bodhicitta), May 7, 1998, Washington, New Jersey.

A teaching given prior to a ceremony for generating the mind of enlightenment (bodhicitta), May 7, 1998, Washington, New Jersey.

His Holiness explains the Buddhist concept of mind to the participants of a Mind Science symposium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA, USA.

His Holiness explains the Buddhist concept of mind to the participants of a Mind Science symposium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA, USA.

A teaching given on how to gain happiness and the path to liberation from suffering during the Second Dharma Celebration, November 5th-8th 1982, New Delhi, India.

A teaching given on how to gain happiness and the path to liberation from suffering during the Second Dharma Celebration, November 5th-8th 1982, New Delhi, India.

A talk given on the need for a greater sense of human community in order to bring about peace in our world.

A talk given on the need for a greater sense of human community in order to bring about peace in our world.

A short prayer that helps us develop the correct attitude towards the virtuous friend

A short prayer that helps us develop the correct attitude towards the virtuous friend

Teachings on the seven points of the cause and effect instruction and tong-len

Teachings on the seven points of the cause and effect instruction and tong-len

On two visits to Singapore in 1997, Venerable Lama Ribur Rinpoche taught extensively on how to generate that precious mind of enlightenment.

On two visits to Singapore in 1997, Venerable Lama Ribur Rinpoche taught extensively on how to generate that precious mind of enlightenment.

A "must-read" for all Buddhists, this text presents a detailed discussion in support of vegetarianism and animal welfare. Now available as an ebook.

A "must-read" for all Buddhists, this text presents a detailed discussion in support of vegetarianism and animal welfare. Now available as an ebook.

Teachings about the four noble truths, bodhicitta, the five paths and ten levels, and the six perfections

Teachings about the four noble truths, bodhicitta, the five paths and ten levels, and the six perfections

Teachings about the four noble truths, bodhicitta, the five paths and ten levels, and the six perfections

Teachings about the four noble truths, bodhicitta, the five paths and ten levels, and the six perfections

The Graduated Path to Liberation is a rendering in English of teachings given by Geshe Rabten Rinpoche in Dharamsala, India, in 1969. It follows the traditional lam-rim (graduated path) format, which originated with the teachings of Shakyamuni Buddha and has been passed down through an unbroken succession of Indian and Tibetan masters.

CHAPTERS
Introduction
Four Noble Truths
Bodhicitta
The Five Paths and the Ten Levels
The Six Perfections
Conclusion and Notes

There are five successive paths on which a bodhisattva develops:

  1. The path of accumulation (sambharamarga)
  2. The path of training or preparation (prayogamarga)
  3. The path of seeing (darshanamarga)
  4. The path of intense contemplation (bhavanamarga)
  5. The path of liberation or no more training(vimuktimarga)

When bodhicitta has been developed until it is natural and intrinsic, the bodhisattva has completely obtained the sambharamarga (which has lower levels before this point). Then many spiritual powers (rddhi) are attained, such as psychic power (mahabhijna), which enables the bodhisattva to know other people's thoughts, to know the past and future events of other beings' lives, to fly, to have multiple bodies, and so forth. A bodhisattva does not concentrate on these techniques specially to get a particular power; these powers come naturally. But the bodhisattva is able to put them to good use because these powers aid greatly in seeing the karma, spiritual development and potentialities of other beings, and whether or not they are in a state where they can be helped escape from samsara. The bodhisattva can see at which place beings can receive teachings from the buddhas and bodhisattvas in the various buddha-fields. 14 Many other virtues also accrue to the bodhisattva. read more

Teachings about the four noble truths, bodhicitta, the five paths and ten levels, and the six perfections.

Teachings about the four noble truths, bodhicitta, the five paths and ten levels, and the six perfections.

A commentary on Lama Tsongkhapa Guru Yoga practice by Geshe Rabten.

A commentary on Lama Tsongkhapa Guru Yoga practice by Geshe Rabten.

A commentary on the emptiness section of the Seven Point Mind Training text

A commentary on the emptiness section of the Seven Point Mind Training text

Mirror of Wisdom includes commentaries on the emptiness section of Mind Training Like the Rays of the Sun and The Heart Sutra.

CHAPTERS
Mirror of Wisdom
Part One: Introduction
Part One: Mind Training - Developing Bodhicitta
Part One: Mind Training - Developing Emptiness
Part One: Learning to Become a Buddha
Part Two: Commentary on the Heart Sutra

PERFECT ABANDONMENT AND PERFECT REALIZATION

To become a completely enlightened person, a buddha, we must fulfill two levels of achievement-the "level of perfect abandonment" and "the level of perfect realization." In order to achieve perfect realization we need to travel the structured spiritual path. We begin by cultivating great compassion. When great compassion arises in our mind, the Mahayana seed has been activated within us. We are then able to generate the altruistic mind of enlightenment, or bodhicitta, which we can also call the bodhisattva spirit. As we progress through the five spiritual paths-the path of accumulation, the path of preparation, the path of seeing, or insight, the path of meditation and the path of no more learning-we also progress through what are known as the "ten spiritual grounds of bodhisattvas." When we complete the five paths and ten grounds, we reach the state of highest enlightenment. We keep on discarding what are known as the "objects of abandonment" along the way-the things we must get rid of in order to progress-and we continue accumulating realizations. Eventually, we will have what is known as "omniscient wisdom," the all-knowing wisdom of a buddha. That is the perfect realization. read more

A commentary on the emptiness section of the Seven Point Mind Training text

A commentary on the emptiness section of the Seven Point Mind Training text

A commentary on the emptiness section of the Seven Point Mind Training text

A commentary on the emptiness section of the Seven Point Mind Training text

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

A Commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training

Khensur Rinpoche Geshe Jampa Tegchok gives a commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training. He bases his explanation on Kadampa Geshe Chekawa’s classic text, The Seven Point Mind Training.

Khensur Rinpoche Geshe Jampa Tegchok gives a commentary on the Seven-Point Mind Training. He bases his explanation on Kadampa Geshe Chekawa’s classic text, The Seven Point Mind Training.

A commentary on Lama Tsongkhapa's text which covers the entire Buddhist path to enlightenment.

A commentary on Lama Tsongkhapa's text which covers the entire Buddhist path to enlightenment.

A teaching on The Three Principal Aspects of the Path by Ven. Denma Lochö Rinpoche at Jamyang Buddhist Centre, London, in early October 2001.

A teaching on The Three Principal Aspects of the Path by Ven. Denma Lochö Rinpoche at Jamyang Buddhist Centre, London, in early October 2001.

A commentary on Lama Tsongkhapa's text which covers the entire Buddhist path to enlightenment.

A commentary on Lama Tsongkhapa's text which covers the entire Buddhist path to enlightenment.

Teachings on the Heart Sutra, a Perfection of Wisdom text by Geshe Jampa Tegchok in Somerset, England 2007.

Teachings on the Heart Sutra, a Perfection of Wisdom text by Geshe Jampa Tegchok in Somerset, England 2007.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary by Khen Rinpoche Lama Lhundrup offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

This commentary by Khen Rinpoche Lama Lhundrup offers us a deeper understanding of the inconceivable qualities of Tara’s holy body, speech and mind and how her different aspects can help us overcome difficulties in our daily lives and Dharma practice.

A teaching on the Seven-Point Mind Training by Geshe Lama Konchog at Atisha Centre, Bendigo, Australia, from October 31 to November 3, 1987. Translated by Dhawa Dundrup. Transcribed and edited by Ven. Thupten Konchog, who accepts all errors and omissions. Second edit by Sandra Smith, January 2013.

Chapter 1: Putting Effort into Spiritual Practice
Chapter 2: The Preliminaries
Chapter 3: Equanimity
Chapter 4: Generating Bodhicitta
Chapter 5: Equalising and Exchanging the Self With Others;Taking and Giving
Chapter 6: Conventional and Ultimate Bodhicitta; Taking and Giving

Chapter 6: Conventional and Ultimate Bodhicitta; Taking and Giving

Since we have received the opportunity to be able to practice Dharma, we should no longer be attached to the three realms of cyclic existence. Instead, we should aspire to the attainment of enlightenment, so we can liberate all sentient beings from the suffering of cyclic existence. Please make this understanding the motivation for listening to this teaching. read more

A teaching on the Seven-Point Mind Training by Geshe Lama Konchog at Atisha Centre, Bendigo, Australia, from October 31 to November 3, 1987. Translated by Dhawa Dundrup. Transcribed and edited by Ven. Thupten Konchog, who accepts all errors and omissions. Second edit by Sandra Smith, January 2013.

Chapter 1: Putting Effort into Spiritual Practice
Chapter 2: The Preliminaries
Chapter 3: Equanimity
Chapter 4: Generating Bodhicitta
Chapter 5: Equalising and Exchanging the Self With Others;Taking and Giving
Chapter 6: Conventional and Ultimate Bodhicitta; Taking and Giving

Chapter 5: Equalising and Exchanging the Self With Others; Taking and Giving

The great Atisha had 150 teachers, but he was not satisfied with 149 of them because he wanted the instructions on generating the precious bodhicitta. He searched for a long time for a lama who would teach this subject and in the course of this he endured many hardships. One such hardship was a long sea voyage which ultimately led him to Lama Selingpa. read more

A teaching on the Seven-Point Mind Training by Geshe Lama Konchog at Atisha Centre, Bendigo, Australia, from October 31 to November 3, 1987. Translated by Dhawa Dundrup. Transcribed and edited by Ven. Thupten Konchog, who accepts all errors and omissions. Second edit by Sandra Smith, January 2013.

Chapter 1: Putting Effort into Spiritual Practice
Chapter 2: The Preliminaries
Chapter 3: Equanimity
Chapter 4: Generating Bodhicitta
Chapter 5: Equalising and Exchanging the Self With Others;Taking and Giving
Chapter 6: Conventional and Ultimate Bodhicitta; Taking and Giving

Chapter 4: Generating Bodhicitta

Please make your motivation like this: “Since attaining this human body with all the leisures and endowments, I will not be attached to the three realms of cyclic existence. Instead, this very day I will try to eliminate the source of all suffering—the self-cherishing thought. In order to do this, I will listen to these profound instructions on the teachings. By listening to this teaching, may I have the potential to liberate myself and all other sentient beings from suffering.” read more

A teaching on the Seven-Point Mind Training by Geshe Lama Konchog at Atisha Centre, Bendigo, Australia, from October 31 to November 3, 1987. Translated by Dhawa Dundrup. Transcribed and edited by Ven. Thupten Konchog, who accepts all errors and omissions. Second edit by Sandra Smith, January 2013.

Chapter 1: Putting Effort into Spiritual Practice
Chapter 2: The Preliminaries
Chapter 3: Equanimity
Chapter 4: Generating Bodhicitta
Chapter 5: Equalising and Exchanging the Self With Others;Taking and Giving
Chapter 6: Conventional and Ultimate Bodhicitta; Taking and Giving

Chapter 3: Equanimity

We have at this present time attained the very good basis of a human body and we have also met with the essence of the Mahayana teachings, both of which are very difficult to find. The world  is now in a degenerate time, called the age of conflict, It is, in fact, a very bad time. Although we were not born during the good times when the Dharma was freely taught and was widespread, nevertheless, we have heard the teachings and have engaged in learning about the practice of Dharma and precious bodhicitta. So, we are extremely fortunate. read more

 Biography of Kyabje Yongdzin Ling Dorjechang

The Senior Tutor to His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, and Ninety-seventh Throneholder of Je Tsongkhapa, the great Yongdzin Ling Dorjechang, Jetzun Thubten Lungtog Namgyal Trinley Palzangpo, was born at the break of dawn on the sixth day of the eleventh month of the Tibetan Water-Rabbit year (1903). His mother, Sonam Dekyi, gave birth to him at Yabphu, a holy place of Chakrasamvara and consort, north-west of Lhasa, Tibet. He is the sixth in his series of reincarnations. His predecessor, Sharchoe Yongdzin Ling Tulku, Losang Lungtog Tenzin Trinley, was the tutor to His Holiness the Thirteenth Dalai Lama. During his full meditational retreat on Vajrabhairava, lasting over three years, he composed one of his many well-known writings between sessions of his daily meditations. Called the Eighteen Rung Ladder of Vajrabhairava Ekavira, it was published by Tibet house, New Delhi in 1981. This is the most complete and authoritative manual available for the practice and study of Vajrabhairava, as this lineage is highly esteemed as the human manifestation of the deity Vajrabhairava himself. The Fifth Ling Rinpoche was in turn the incarnation of Ngawang Lungtog Yonten Gyatso, Tutor to His Holiness Khedrub Gyatso, the Eleventh Dalai Lama, and Seventy-fifth Gaden Throneholder. There are many other manifestations of the lineage of Ling Rinpoche extending back to the time of the Buddha. read more

Lama Thubten Yeshe was born in Tibet in 1935 not far from Lhasa in the town of Tölung Dechen. Two hours away by horse was the Chi-me Lung Gompa, home for about 100 nuns of the Gelug tradition. It had been a few years since their learned abbess and guru had passed away when Nenung Pawo Rinpoche, a Kagyü lama widely famed for his psychic powers, came by their convent. They approached him and asked, "Where is our guru now?" He answered that in a nearby village there was a boy born at such and such a time, and if they investigated they would discover that he was their incarnated abbess. Following his advice they found the young Lama Yeshe to whom they brought many offerings and gave the name Thondrub Dorje. read more

From time to time while giving teachings at various centers around the world, Rinpoche would tell stories of his childhood: in Thami, then in Tibet, where he went when he was ten, and finally India, where he first met Lama Thubten Yeshe, with whom he would remain as heart disciple until Lama passed a way in 1984. Compiled and edited by Ven Ailsa Cameron.

I don't remember what my father looked like. I think he died when my mother was carrying my brother, Sangye, and I was a baby. People say that he had a beard and didn't speak much; they describe him as a placid person who didn't get upset very easily. I don't know whether he was ever a monk, but I was told that he was very good at reading texts and doing pujas for other people.

My father was sick for some time before he died. One day after coming back into the house from working in the field, my mother saw my father sitting quietly by the fireplace. She called to him, "Father, do you want anything?" but he did not reply. His body was upright; it is possible that he was in meditation, but I think my mother didn't realize this. She went to tell her friends, but they didn't know what to do. She should have asked a lama, but I think her understanding was quite limited. Her friends must have thought he was dead, so they told her to take the body outside and burn it. read more

Complete Biography

From the website of the Office of Tibet, the official agency of His Holiness the Dalai Lama in London. www.tibet.net

His Holiness the 14th the Dalai Lama Tenzin Gyatso, is the head of state and spiritual leader of the Tibetan people. He was born Lhamo Dhondrub on 6 July 1935, in a small village called Taktser in northeastern Tibet. Born to a peasant family, His Holiness was recognized at the age of two, in accordance with Tibetan tradition, as the reincarnation of his predecessor the 13th Dalai Lama, and thus an incarnation Avalokitesvara, the Buddha of Compassion. read more

A commentary given by His Holiness the Dalai Lama on the text written by Kadampa Geshe Langri Tangpa in Dharamsala, India, 1981.

A commentary given by His Holiness the Dalai Lama on the text written by Kadampa Geshe Langri Tangpa in Dharamsala, India, 1981.

This teaching was given at Tushita Mahayana Meditation Center, New Delhi, on July 4, 1979.

This teaching was given at Tushita Mahayana Meditation Center, New Delhi, on July 4, 1979.

Lama Thubten Yeshe clarifies dharma practice and the role of the mind, New Delhi, India, October 31, 1979.

Lama Thubten Yeshe clarifies dharma practice and the role of the mind, New Delhi, India, October 31, 1979.

Tenzin Ösel Hita gave this talk on February 9, 2013 at Choe Khor Sum Ling Centre, Bangalore. 

Tenzin Ösel Hita gave this talk on February 9, 2013 at Choe Khor Sum Ling Centre, Bangalore. 

This Dharma talk was given at Amitabha Buddhist Centre, Singapore, 2012. It includes a question and answer session, where Ösel discusses his experiences as a monk and his vision for how to benefit others in the future.

This Dharma talk was given at Amitabha Buddhist Centre, Singapore, 2012. It includes a question and answer session, where Ösel discusses his experiences as a monk and his vision for how to benefit others in the future.

Tenzin Ösel Hita gave these Dharma talks during the 45th Kopan Course at Kopan Monastery, Nepal, November 27, and December 07, 2012.

Tenzin Ösel Hita gave these Dharma talks during the 45th Kopan Course at Kopan Monastery, Nepal, November 27, and December 07, 2012.

This is the second of two talks given during the 45th Kopan Lam-rim Course at Kopan Monastery in 2012. Ösel covers many lam-rim topics such as guru devotion, Dharma, the sufferings of samsara, our five senses and love, all from a contemporary viewpoint.

This is the second of two talks given during the 45th Kopan Lam-rim Course at Kopan Monastery in 2012. Ösel covers many lam-rim topics such as guru devotion, Dharma, the sufferings of samsara, our five senses and love, all from a contemporary viewpoint.